chatter.chaboud.com

11/17/2003

Diaper bombs…

Filed under: — site admin @ 12:40 pm

Dyn-o-mat, a company that specializes in environmental absorbers, has tested a product that can be used to turn clouds into a gel that Dyn-o-mat claims is non-toxic and dissolves on contact with sea-water. This powder would be used to curtail the effects of building weather in regions affected by hurricanes. Though Dyn-o-mat refuses to disclose the composition of their weather controlling powder and the cited article makes no effort beyond regurgitating their claims, it is most likely a very fine sodium polyacrylate powder which, though non-toxic and commonly used in disposable diapers, could be used to fully dehydrate one’s eyes or lungs if airborn. With an administration that demands open permission to shoot to kill on diplomatic visits, one can only wonder how long it will take for Donald Rumsfeld to realize the “crowd control” applications of air-delivered sodium polyacrylate (or polyacrylamide, for that matter).

11/12/2003

Your mode of transport is not cool enough…

Filed under: — site admin @ 4:11 pm

Looking to bring the the same type of care-free safety presented in its lines of All-Terrain Vehicles and Ski-Doo snowmobiles to the road, Bombardier (the name is telling enough) recently presented its EMBRIO concept. Forbes has a gushing story with a pair of pictures and little else. Even with the consequences of mono-cycles and four-ton trucks sharing the road firmly in mind, this form of transport sounds very desirable.

11/7/2003

Some things cops can do, some things they can’t…

Filed under: — site admin @ 2:56 pm

Police officers in Texas who are unaware of some of the perks of their chosen profession can turn to Robert Daniel Bliss of Friendswood. Bliss dressed as a police officer and threatened to arrest prostitutes unless they provided their services to him for free.

In Texas, officers seem to be too preoccupied with other activities, such as fishing while on duty, to be bothered to wear costumes to illicit genital exposure, but such is not the case in Japan, where a male officer who was dressed as a schoolgirl as part of “Operation Crossdresser” met with success in catching a problematic flasher.

One type of flashing that police officers will have to live with is the kind that drivers use to warn oncoming traffic of speed-traps. A Williamson County, Tennessee judge dismissed a Franklin-city court ruling against Harlie Walker, 75, for interfering with a police officer’s performance of duty by flashing his lights in an effort to warn other drivers to reduce their speed. Walker’s attorney argued that communication with his headlights was within his first amendment rights. Start flashing…

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